Smith family history

To highlight some of the CHC’s archive’s holdings, the Hownikan is featuring photographs and family history of every founding Citizen Potawatomi family. This article traces the Smith family from an 1823 voter list from Michilimakinac County, Michigan, to the 1887 Oklahoma allotment roll.

Slavin family history

From their humble roots in Ireland, the Slavin family forebears were among the many Irish immigrants who sought independence and stability in the United States. Together, with their Potawatomi relatives, they withstood numerous challenges to help establish a firm foundation for the Citizen Potawatomi Nation in Oklahoma.

Connections between Potawatomi and Kickapoo endure

Once neighbors in the Great Lakes region prior to colonial contact, the Potawatomi and Kickapoo people have a great deal in common. These connections have been seen in food, housing and other customs, extending even to ancestors.

155th anniversary of Treaty of 1867

February 2022 is the 155th anniversary of the Treaty of 1867, the last of several treaties that the Citizen Potawatomi signed with the U.S. federal government. This treaty was the final push for the first Citizen Potawatomi families to move from Kansas to Indian Territory. The U.S. Government officially ended treaty negotiations with Native American tribes in 1871.

Hownikan Podcast: January 2022

During this episode, we visit with an author about her new book that tells stories from a Tribal elder’s childhood, a domestic violence prevention specialist about National Stalking Awareness Month and a historian about the 155th anniversary of the last treaty CPN signed with the federal government.

Frapp family history

The Frapp’s association with the Tribe began with the marriage of John B. Frapp and Josette Wilmette, the daughter of Archange Chevallier and Antoine Wilmette (Ouilmette), who were early residents of present-day Chicago.

160th anniversary of becoming the Citizen Potawatomi

On Nov. 15, 1861, nearly 80 Potawatomi headmen and Tribal members gathered with federal officials to sign the Treaty of 1861. The agreement created two separate Potawatomi tribes on the Kansas River Reservation, establishing the Citizen Potawatomi and Prairie Band.

Uncovering the history of Columbus

The United States celebrates Columbus Day — also recognized as Indigenous Peoples’ Day — on the second Monday in October every year, and the holiday further perpetuates false narratives.

Exiled refugees connect on the prairie

After removal west of the Mississippi, the Potawatomi utilized the limited available resources to survive. The Tribe’s expedition to present-day Missouri and Iowa put them in first-hand contact with other groups also experiencing displacement, including Mormons.

Resources highlight the Trail of Death

The Potawatomi Trail of Death began today in 1838. More than 850 Tribal members walked 660 miles from Indiana to Kansas. Written and visual records provide insight into this turbulent time and help present-day Potawatomi remember and honor their ancestors’ trials.