Fall brings Wadasé home for a visit

CPN Eagle Aviary managers Bree Dunham and Jennifer Randell write about a recent sighting of Wadasé Zhabwé, a bald eagle released from their care nine years ago now thriving in the wild.

CPN offers exciting options for National Field Trip Month

October is National Field Trip Month. Citizen Potawatomi Nation offers area schools and youth groups two options for an exciting experience outside of the classroom at the Cultural Heritage Center and Eagle Aviary.

CPN Eagle Aviary celebrates 10-year anniversary

The Citizen Potawatomi Nation Eagle Aviary received its U.S. Fish and Wildlife permit and opened its doors one decade ago this June. Aviary managers Jennifer Randell and Bree Dunham sat down with the Hownikan to reflect on the last decade of caring for these sacred animals and what the next 10 years may bring.

Hownikan Podcast: CPN Aviary 10-year anniversary

In this very special episode, we’re celebrating the 10-year anniversary of the opening of Citizen Potawatomi Nation’s Eagle Aviary this June, which allowed visitors in for the first time Family Reunion Festival weekend in 2012.

To the rescue

In addition to providing a home for some of the Potawatomi peoples’ most sacred animals, the CPN Eagle Aviary staff also protects and nurtures other creatures by responding to animal emergencies across the Nation’s jurisdiction and partnering with the WildCare Foundation in Noble, Oklahoma.

Hownikan Podcast: July 2021

In this episode, we’ll hear about the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978 and its effect on tribes, discuss the connection between cartography and Indigeneity, and learn the history of an artist who documented the Potawatomi Trail of Death in the late 1830s.

Hownikan Podcast: June 2021

During today’s episode, we are hearing from a Tribal member who recently received a seat on a White House environmental council, take a trip through the community garden and revisit the opening of the CPN Eagle Aviary.

Kchemko gises — Big Bear Moon — at the CPN Eagle Aviary

During this time, many of the CPN Eagle Aviary residents are building nests, and the pairs there have become more territorial and vocal while defending their space. Everyone’s appetite has increased. Many times, they forecast the weather better than the local meteorologists.