Trail cameras provide a unique view of CPN

Youth programs during summer 2021 provided an opportunity for the Citizen Potawatomi Nation to purchase and place trail cameras across its jurisdiction. The images help connect students to Mother Nature and open dialogue around conservation and land stewardship. The Nation now extends access to trail camera images through potawatomiheritage.com.

To the rescue

In addition to providing a home for some of the Potawatomi peoples’ most sacred animals, the CPN Eagle Aviary staff also protects and nurtures other creatures by responding to animal emergencies across the Nation’s jurisdiction and partnering with the WildCare Foundation in Noble, Oklahoma.

Hownikan Podcast: July 2021

In this episode, we’ll hear about the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978 and its effect on tribes, discuss the connection between cartography and Indigeneity, and learn the history of an artist who documented the Potawatomi Trail of Death in the late 1830s.

Hownikan Podcast: June 2021

During today’s episode, we are hearing from a Tribal member who recently received a seat on a White House environmental council, take a trip through the community garden and revisit the opening of the CPN Eagle Aviary.

Kchemko gises — Big Bear Moon — at the CPN Eagle Aviary

During this time, many of the CPN Eagle Aviary residents are building nests, and the pairs there have become more territorial and vocal while defending their space. Everyone’s appetite has increased. Many times, they forecast the weather better than the local meteorologists.

Wadasé makes a return visit

Looking for patterns in frequent visits to areas during the fall and winter, we hope to narrow down locations that she might have chosen to nest. Although, there is one pattern and place unrelated to the focus of nesting that stands out. Wadasé has never failed to come home in the beginning of fall or during the winter months.

Wadasé Zhabwé’s telemetry stuns experts

Wadasé’s last visit to the aviary was the first week of September. True to her pattern over the last few years, she visits late fall or early winter, briefly, as if to just check in.

Summertime at the CPN Aviary

Summer is the Citizen Potawatomi Nation Eagle Aviary’s busiest season. It includes the Family Reunion Festival, the Potawatomi Leadership Program, summer camp tours as well as eagle feather molting. The heat and severe weather also require staff to take extra precautions.

Requesting feathers from the CPN Eagle Aviary

The Potawatomi use eagle feathers in ceremony, while smudging and as a part of regalia. Eagles molt from mid-March to late September, and during this time, the Citizen Potawatomi Nation Eagle Aviary staff collects feathers at sunrise every day.