2019 Honored Families — Part 2

Every year at the CPN Family Reunion Festival, the Nation honors a group of families that moved to Oklahoma and eventually formed the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. The 2019 Honored Families are Johnson, Lafromboise, LaReau, LeClaire, Melott, Rhodd, Tescier, Weld and Young.

Saving ‘the good seed’

Potawatomi began eating wild rice after settling around the Great Lakes between 800 and 1,300 years ago. It was a staple of their diet and society, and harvest and processing it required everyone’s participation.

Keeping Legends Alive remembers early Native American efforts

Haskell Indian Nations University held Keeping Legends Alive in September 2018 to celebrate two big occasions in the school’s history: the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I and Haskell’s 1926 Indian Celebration, which included a huge powwow to dedicate the university’s football stadium and archway.

Kansas City charter school district aims to teach Native history, culture

Submitted by Jennifer Dye Crossroads Academy – Central Street focuses on producing culturally literate scholars from its diverse student body by looking at every aspect of a child’s education through an equity lens and working hard to create an anti-racist school staff and community. This means examining school curriculum, particularly social studies, through different perspectives. Read More »

What to expect while recording stories and history during Family Reunion Festival

Every year during the Family Reunion Festival, a few Citizen Potawatomi Nation employees set up cameras and invite all ages of Honored Family descendants to volunteer information about their lineage on video. This year’s Honored Families are Anderson, Beaubien, Bertrand, Bourbonnais, Ogee, Pettifer, Toupin, Wano and Yott. This process documents Potawatomi people’s stories, expands Tribal Read More »

Way Back Wednesday: Massaw, great grandmother of Jim Thorpe

Massaw, great grandmother of Wathohuk [Jim Thorpe], was an influential and distinguished chieftess whose presence carried weight in councils, a right customarily reserved for males. She resided within the village of headman Keewawnay; her cabin reserved for the mediation of both Tribal and American dignitaries. Massaw also played host to popular social gatherings that frequently Read More »

Potawatomi history and ancestry through the eyes of George Godfrey

The nineteenth century was a time of innovation but also continued hardship. Relics and history from this era can easily be lost and forgotten due to neglect. Yet it has been proven that if someone is determined and willing to put in the time and effort, the mysteries of the past can become a reality. Read More »