Remembering Potawatomi ghost towns

From bustling pioneer settlements to oil booms and busts and growing metropolitan areas, the state of Oklahoma has undergone many changes since the Potawatomi arrived in Indian Territory in 1872. That includes the demise of many small, rural communities. Although numerous towns once existed throughout Citizen Potawatomi Nation’s jurisdiction, a few stand out.

Capps and Barrett awarded Pottawatomie Power top spots

Every decade, the Countywide & Sun newspaper conducts the Pottawatomie Power Polls. Readers and residents nominate Pottawatomie County leaders and then vote to determine the top 10. In 2020, two of Citizen Potawatomi Nation’s executive team received rankings as the county’s two most powerful people.

Native land rights and the Land Runs of 1891

The first Oklahoma land run took place on April 22, 1889, and established present-day Oklahoma City and Guthrie in one day. The Citizen Potawatomi Nation’s historical ties are with the Land Runs of 1891, which took place on Sept. 22, 23 and 28.

Tribal gaming has $6.9 billion impact in Oklahoma

Don’t let anyone tell you that Oklahoma’s tribal nations aren’t paying their fair share of fees and taxes to the state government. According to a report released by the Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association, tribes have paid $980 million in gaming fees to the State of Oklahoma, while their gaming operations have a $6.9 billion impact Read More »

Tribal economic impact surpasses $500 million once again

The Citizen Potawatomi Nation had a $540 million impact in Oklahoma for 2014. CPN directly supported 2,100 jobs and paid $78.6 million in wages and benefits. CPN indirectly supported thousands more jobs and boosted local economies by making purchases of more than $212 million on goods and services. Tribal economic impact has grown nearly $500 Read More »

Guest column: Local Tribe greatly benefits our communities

As a legislator, I always appreciate those in our communities who work together to make our local areas a better place to live, work and play. Oftentimes, these community partners go about their business without seeking much acclaim when much is due to them. Today I want to briefly show my appreciation for one of Read More »