Hownikan Podcast: December 2019

This episode is filled with music! A Potawatomi folk artist releases her first solo album and plays a show in Oklahoma City, and the CPN Language Department teaches kids Christmas carols as part of a youth choir program. We’ll also explore the ways the Tribe gives back to the community around the holidays.

Hownikan Podcast: November 2019

This episode explores a bit of the holiday season; a piece of craft work passed down through a family and a traditional Thanksgiving prayer in the Nishnabé language highlight ways to celebrate with loved ones. There’s also an update on the progress of CPN’s recycling program and a look at a unique extra task two employees take on once a year.

Kansas City charter school district aims to teach Native history, culture

Submitted by Jennifer Dye Crossroads Academy – Central Street focuses on producing culturally literate scholars from its diverse student body by looking at every aspect of a child’s education through an equity lens and working hard to create an anti-racist school staff and community. This means examining school curriculum, particularly social studies, through different perspectives. Read More »

Incorporate Nishnabe traditions into your holiday gifting

Although many cultures across the globe give presents during the holidays, for Potawatomi, the practice spans all seasons. Native customs vary between small presents on a daily basis to larger exchanges during ceremonial gatherings and diplomatic meetings. “Gift giving is one of those things that is often used to open lines of communication and to Read More »

Potawatomi vs. the Wild West

Prior to statehood, Oklahoma served as a haven for many legendary fugitives. Cattle thefts, bank robberies and murders happened frequently, and stories passed down connect several Potawatomi families to famous outlaws. Some accounts indicate the Bourbonnais family hid Frank and Jesse James in their cabin. For one Potawatomi family, the association with Indian Territory criminals Read More »

2018 Commemorative Trail of Death Caravan

In late summer 1838 near Twin Lakes, Indiana, U.S. General John Tipton called a meeting with the Potawatomi around Chief Menominee’s village. Menominee refused to give up what remained of his people’s land. However, the federal government claimed ownership due to prior treaties and documents signed by him and other Potawatomi representatives. Militia placed Menominee Read More »

Native American endurance

The fur trade’s decline and colonial competition increased turmoil across Indian Country. Through the 18th to early 19th century, discord among Native Americans and the federal government continued to grow. Section five of the Cultural Heritage Center focuses on this influential time in North American history. Each Native group had their own survival tactics. Some Read More »