October 24, 2019

George Winter’s artwork and writing helps tell a more complete story of the Trail of Death

Because George Winter's sketches and paintings serve as the only artistic record of any forced removal, CPN Cultural Heritage Center staff chose to use his pieces as key features within the Forced From Land and Culture: Removal gallery.
October 11, 2019

CHC partners with National Park Service helps provide a Native voice in new project

Leaders at the River Raisin National Battlefield Park reached out to Citizen Potawatomi Nation Cultural Heritage Center staff when they began planning a documentary about the battle.
October 4, 2019

Traces of “Mexican Pottawatomie” in 19th century Texas battle

A connection between the Citizen Potawatomi Nation and Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma may hold the key to a curious 1863 Potawatomi census record denoting a particular set of enrollees as “Mexican Pottawatomies.”
September 20, 2019

Potawatomi leader Wabaunsee remembered for his prowess in battle and impact on 19th century Indian Policy

With a reputation that preceded him, Wabaunsee was not only a noted veteran of the Osage Wars, Battle of Tippecanoe, and War of 1812, but also an esteemed religious leader within the ancient Midewiwin Medicine Lodge.
August 21, 2019

War of 1812 and the bloody Battle of Fort Dearborn

This year marks the 207th anniversary of the Battle of Fort Dearborn, once referred to as the Fort Dearborn Massacre.
July 15, 2019

Little Turtle’s War and Native America’s greatest victory over American forces

St. Clair’s Defeat during the Northwest Indian War is known as the largest triumph for Native American forces against the United States Army.
June 19, 2019

2019 Honored Families — Part 2

Every year at the CPN Family Reunion Festival, the Nation honors a group of families that moved to Oklahoma and eventually formed the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. The 2019 Honored Families are Johnson, Lafromboise, LaReau, LeClaire, Melott, Rhodd, Tescier, Weld and Young.
February 7, 2019

“Bourassa the Interpreter” spoke often for Potawatomi of Indiana and Kansas

Joseph Napoleon Bourassa used his affinity and enjoyment of languages to represent the Potawatomi in dealings with the federal government.
January 30, 2019

Saving ‘the good seed’

Potawatomi began eating wild rice after settling around the Great Lakes between 800 and 1,300 years ago. It was a staple of their diet and society, and harvest and processing it required everyone’s participation.