Tribal chieftess’ legacy continues today

One Tribal member rose above Western European ideologies of women and leadership. Massaw, daughter of Potawatomi Chief Wassato and wife of a French-Canadian fur trader, held standings as a Tribal headman and prominent business owner.

Gallery remembers the Potawatomi Trail of Death

Amidst an era of increased expansion by non-Native settlers into the United States’ western frontiers, a single piece of legislation codified federal policy on the topic of removing tribal people from their lands. On May 28, 1830, President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act into law. This legislation authorized the federal government to forcibly Read More »

Way Back Wednesday: 19th Century War Chief Kee-wau-nay

An exceprt from the journal of Potawatomi chronicler George Winter regarding 19th century Potawatomi leader Kee-wau-nay (Prairie Chicken). “Kee-wau-nay was a war chief, one of the old patriarchs of the Pottawattamies of the Wabash. The village of Kee-wau-nay and the charming lake which was in close vicinity was named after the chief. “He was an Read More »

Headdresses not traditional for Potawatomi

The resurgence in positive portrayals of Native American culture has come with unforeseen consequences in recent decades. A drive for purity – specifically in terms of defining what it means to be Indian – has become a prominent topic of discussion in places like Oklahoma, where so many tribal nations, cultures and peoples intermingled. Thanks Read More »

Way Back Wednesday: Pash Po Ho

An excerpt from George Winter’s journal regarding Pash Po Ho. Winter was a participant and chronicler of the Potawatomi Trail of Death.  “Pash Po Ho was an aboriginal gentleman-he was considered the best dressed Pottawattamie Indian in the nation, and was exceedingly graceful when mounted upon his handsomely equipped pony. “The heavy plated bit-handsome bridle-the Read More »

Way Back Wednesday: September 23, 2015 – 19th Century Potawatomi leader Ashkum

  In this week’s look into Citizen Potawatomi history, Way Back Wednesday presents an an excerpt from George Winter’s journal regarding ninetenth century Potawatomi leader Ashkum. “Ash-kum was an orator of some consideration and distinction; he however was not continued in such capacity, when I knew him in eighteen thirty-seven… “In his speeches he always Read More »

Way Back Wednesday: September 16, 2015 – The Council of Keewaunay

Illustrating collaborative efforts between the Cultural Heritage Center and Indiana University is the 1837 painting of the Council of Keewaunay between Indiana Potawatomi and U.S. emigration agents. University staff at the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology photographed the paining and provided a digital copy to the Archive and Research division for exhibition and research Read More »