CPN 2019 Legislative Election Candidacy Filing Notice
November 26, 2018
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November 27, 2018
  1. Goshen College celebrated Indigenous People’s Day in the campus’ church-chapel on Oct. 10. Students and faculty focused on the inhabitants of what is today Elkhart County, Indiana, prior to the arrival of American settlers. Jonathon Schramm, associate professor of sustainability and environmental education, told attendees the history of the Potawatomi that lived in the area, today known as the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. Read more about Goshen College’s Indigenous People’s Day celebration at cpn.news/GoshenIPD.
  2.  In Dowagiac, Michigan, the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi is ramping up Potawatomi language instruction for young children. “We’re putting a heavy emphasis on culture and incorporating the language into object identification and everyday commands,” preschool site manager Elizabeth Rinehard told The Herald-Palladium in a recent interview. “The teachers are learning the language too. … We’re enhancing their identity with their culture, and if they have that, it increases their self-esteem and self-awareness and they’re more successful.” Read more about the Pokagon Band’s early language education efforts at their Rodgers Lake campus at cpn.news/pokagonprek.
  3. Visitors to the Manitowoc County, Wisconsin area might want to check out a recently installed statute dedicated to an early friend of the Potawatomi who originally lived in the area. The Spirit of the Rivers installation is dedicated to Andrew Vieua. The son of an original settler in the area, Vieua purchased 80 acres of Black Earth village land near modern day Mishicot to allow Potawatomi under Chief Mishicott a place to remain amidst encroachment from white settlers. Hannahville Indian Community Chairperson Ken Meshigaud, a descendent of Chief Mishicott, spoke at the dedication. Learn more about the Spirit of the Rivers dedication ceremony here.
  4. Tribal investment in non-gaming enterprises is paying off for the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi. Mno-Bmadsen (The Good Path) is a tribal-owned holding and investment company. It currently boasts five different business such as Seven Generations Architecture & Engineering, D.A. Dodd or Accu-Mold. Those five firms have more than 300 people and according to Mno-Bmadsen, and have a profitable rate of return. To learn more about Mno-Bmadsen, visit here.