Hownikan Volume 38 – 2017
December 8, 2016
Citizen Potawatomi Nation gives to Maud Public Schools music department
December 9, 2016

Q&A with Rekindling 7 Generations program participant Anna Rhodd Brimm

This month I wanted to give you a first person point of view from one of our program participants, Anna Rhodd Brimm. She is a member of the Rhodd family and has Citizen Potawatomi, Ponca and Sac & Fox tribal affiliations. Currently a student at Konawa High School, she hopes to graduate and attend to St. Gregory’s University or another great college and become a veterinary technician.

We encourage everyone to like our Facebook Page, https://www.facebook.com/R7Gen to stay up to date about all our workshops, classes, and community events. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at Lakota.Pochedley@potawatomi.org or 405-878-5830. All our programs are Potawatomi and Native preference.

Migwetch!

What does being Potawatomi mean to you?

“It means a lot to me because as I learn more about my culture and heritage I am able to share it with my younger relatives so our traditions continue to live on. Knowing more about my culture makes me a stronger person and know myself better.”

Why did you get involved with Rekindling 7 Generations?

“I got involved with R7G so I could meet other Native youth to learn more about our cultural traditions.”

What is important about R7G?

“It’s important because we are keeping our Potawatomi traditions alive, and it allows us to share our different Native cultures with fellow Native youth. It’s important to remember all the different aspects of our culture, like our traditional games, sports and foods. It is important to visit with other Native youth so we can learn about all our cultures and traditions, especially living here in Oklahoma. When we get to share our cultures, we can understand each other’s’ backgrounds, it brings us closer together, and it creates a shared respect for everyone’s traditions because you can remember, ‘So-and-so told me about that and that makes sense now.’ R7G creates an open space so all of us can work towards keeping our traditions alive and supporting each other while we do it.”

Do you think it’s important to include all generations for cultural education programs? Why?

“Yes, it is important because then our families know what we are doing and also they can learn with us. I think it is important to get our families and communities involved with everything we are doing.”

Why is family and community important to you?

“My family and community are important because without their help our traditions wouldn’t survive. My family and community helped me start learning about my culture and keep encouraging me to learn more things!”

What has been your favorite part about R7G?

“I love learning everything, especially learning how to bead our turtle medallions and cook meals that include traditional Potawatomi foods like squash casserole and menomin (wild rice) and berries. I enjoy
getting to meet new friends. I have been able to meet friends from all over central Oklahoma at the Native Sports Workshop, and I was able to meet other Potawatomi friends at the Gathering through the Youth Summit and running for Potawatomi Princess. I have also been able meet a lot of Native youth through United National Indian Tribal Youth as a member of the Etem Omvlkusen UNITY Council. R7G has helped me get more involved with my community, and has made me a more outgoing person.”

What are you looking forward to with R7G?

“I look forward to learning more about myself, culture, and language. I am excited to start learning how to sew and working on my ribbon skirt. I look forward to meeting more Potawatomi and Native youth, and also encourage them to participate in R7G!”