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Isaac Morris, 2014 PLP participant and current PLP counselor had a chance to shadow the employees of the National Congress of American Indians on a recent trip to Washington D.C. We caught up with the PLP alum to ask about the experience.

What was the purpose for your visit to DC? 

“The East Central University’s Political Science and Legal Studies department travels to Washington D.C. every two years to take part in the Pi Sigma Alpha Political Science Research Conference at George Washington University.”

How did you get connected with NCAI?

“During the D.C. trip, the students are given an opportunity to intern with a congressman/woman, interest group, or law firm of their choice. Those are not all of the choices. The students can pretty much pick any group they would like as long as the group is able to have them intern for a day. My advisor/professor, Dr. Christine Pappas,
contacted Jamie Gomez at NCAI to see if I would be able to intern at her office.”

Why did you choose to shadow NCAI?

“I have had an interest in tribal politics for the past few years, so I wanted  to intern with an organization that advocates for better tribal policies and also works for the betterment of tribes in America.”

Which departments did you shadow at NCAI?

“When I first arrived in the morning, I shadowed Jamie Gomez, the director of external affairs, and in the  afternoon I shadowed Denise Desiderio, the policy and legislative director.”

What did you learn about NCAI?

“I learned they are very busy. I also learned that NCAI works with various other native organizations which also advocate for the betterment of tribes in America. They are currently working on Native Vote, a campaign aimed at showing the importance of voting for all Native Americans.”

What should others know about NCAI?

“NCAI is not a lobbyist group. The general public should also know that NCAI is here to help all tribes better themselves for future generations, not to just help a select few. They should also know that NCAI works
alongside Native American Rights Fund to try to get certain cases heard by the Supreme Court to change laws that impact Indian Country.”

How do you think this experience will impact your education?

“This experience has already had a huge impact on my education and career, in that I am considering focusing more on policy concerns compared to law when it comes to impacting Indian Country. After this experience, I feel that I can have a bigger impact on Indian Country by creating policy whether than trying to overturn current policies with the law.”

 

Isaac Morris, 2014 PLP participant
and current PLP counselor had a
chance to shadow the employees of
the National Congress of American
Indians on a recent trip to Washington
D.C. We caught up with the
PLP alum to ask about the experience.
What was the purpose for your
visit to DC?
“The East Central University’s Political
Science and Legal Studies
department travels to Washington
D.C. every two years to take part
in the Pi Sigma Alpha Political
Science Research Conference at
George Washington University.”
How did you get connected with
NCAI?
“During the D.C. trip, the students
are given an opportunity to intern
with a congressman/woman, interest
group, or law firm of their
choice. Those are not all of the
choices. The students can pretty
much pick any group they would
like as long as the group is able to
have them intern for a day. My advisor/
professor, Dr. Christine Pappas,
contacted Jamie Gomez at NCAI to
see if I would be able to intern at her
office.”
Why did you choose to shadow
NCAI?
“I have had an interest in tribal politics
for the past few years, so I wanted
to intern with an organization that
advocates for better tribal policies
and also works for the betterment of
tribes in America.”
Which departments did you shadow
at NCAI?
“When I first arrived in the morning, I
shadowed Jamie Gomez, the director
of external affairs, and in the afternoon
I shadowed Denise Desiderio,
the policy and legislative director.”
What did you learn about NCAI?
“I learned they are very busy. I also
learned that NCAI works with various
other native organizations which
also advocate for the betterment of
tribes in America. They are currently
working on Native Vote, a campaign
aimed at showing the importance of
voting for all Native Americans.”
What should others know about
NCAI?
“NCAI is not a lobbyist group. The
general public should also know that
NCAI is here to help all tribes better
themselves for future generations,
not to just help a select few. They
should also know that NCAI works
alongside Native American Rights
Fund to try to get certain cases heard
by the Supreme Court to change laws
that impact Indian Country.”
How do you think this experience
will impact your education?
“This experience has already had a
huge impact on my education and
career, in that I am considering focusing
more on policy concerns
compared to law when it comes to
impacting Indian Country. After this
experience, I feel that I can have a
bigger impact on Indian Country
by creating policy whether than
trying to overturn current policies
with the law.”